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  1. #1
    Supporting Member Reefahholic's Avatar
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    Rhizophora mangle! Anybody care to join me?!?

    So, what is the Rhizophora mangle?!? Some of you might have already guessed or know, but for those of you who didn't, it's the Red Mangrove! I'm about to start a new journey and was wondering if anybody else cares to join me.? I'm not sure what's always intrigued me about Mangroves, but maybe it's because they tend to be a challenge, but are they really? The recent black Mangrove seeds I collected (100) have all died. They sprouted, but died. So yes, they can be somewhat of a challenge "IF" you haven't done any homework. The death of these seeds truly upset me and fueled my research. It was a blessing and a curse. The blessing is now I know how to take care of one properly, what makes them thrive, the species I want to keep, the common mistakes made, and why most people fail. I've also learned why many Mangroves die and I'm pretty sure what contributed to the death of my recent seedlings.


    So now you might be thinking..."Why the Red Mangrove." Good question. In short, it's the best species for our hobby, their hardy, aesthetically pleasing, and the AERIAL ROOTS aka prop roots. Yes...these can be encouraged to grow and will grow easily if done properly.

    After reading an article by Julian Sprung (The guy who started the Mangrove obsession in the reefing community) and another article by Anthony Calfo (very well know reefer on RC and in the reefing community in general), I became very interested in keeping mangroves long term. Not just keeping them, but creating an environment so they will thrive! Both articles are linked below.

    http://www.twolittlefishies.com/images/mangrove_manual.pdf

    Mangroves for the Marine Aquarium by Anthony Calfo - Reefkeeping.com


    All this said...I'm doing a mangrove display tank. I'm not asking anybody to do a display tank, but if you wanna join me, let's grow some Mangroves! If you wanna sump them, overflow them, pot them, etc...let's do it!



    First things first! Read this....


    Just a little introduction below:


    Rhizophora mangle, the Red Mangrove, is probably the best known mangrove of all mangroves and belongs to the "true mangroves".

    The Red Mangrove is a strong and tough mangrove. Rhizophora mangle is able to grow in different climates a propagule from the tropical zone will grow in South Carolina USA it can handle changing humidity, salinity, air- and watertemperature and the propagule lasts for up to one year floating in the ocean, this characteristis made it able for Rhizophora mangle to colonize huge territories and to compete with other manrove species.

    Territories that have been colonized by Rhizophora mangle sometimes drive out existing local mangrove species. Rhizophora mangle definitely is the most dominant mangrove on our planet.

    The name Rhizophora mangle is Greek and Spanish. Rhizophora "rhizo" meaning root and "phora" meaning bear or carry in reference to the numerous prop roots growing from the trunk and branches of the mangrove. Mangle is Spanish and means mangrove, it is the word for this plant used by the Taino people of the Caribbean Islands.

    Rhizophora mangle has quite a few common names, the most common one is Red Mangrove, most probably from its stilt roots that often have a reddish coloration. In America Rhizopora mangle is also called American Mangrove in South America Rhizophora mangle has numerous names changing from "apareiba", "mangle dulce", "mangle rojo" to "tiri wai" on the Fiji Islands.

    Rhizophora mangle was described for the first time in 1753 by Linnaeus.



    Rhizophora mangle is the most widespread mangrove on our planet and colonized with its adaptability and long-living torpedo seeds many parts of the world. The Red Mangrove was als spread by human for coastal protection and aquaculture. Nowadays Rhizophora mangle grows between latitude 25 north and 35 south from the equator.


    Countries:
    USA: Florida, Hawaii, Georgia, Lousiana, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Texas
    Central America: Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama
    Caribbean: Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Cayman Islands, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, ...
    South America: Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Galapagos Islands, Guiana, Peru, Suriname, Venezuela
    West-Africa: Angola, Aquatorialguinea, Benin, Gabun, Gambia, Ghana, Guniea, Guinea Bissau, Kamerun, Kongo, Liberia, Mauretanien, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Togo, Western Sahara
    Oceania: Fiji Islands, Polynesia

    Humans introduced Rhizophora mangle to Hawaii, the United States and Queensland in Australia.

    Rhizophora stylosa was known as Red Mangrove for a long time.

    Rhizophora mangle is the most common mangrove formation in the Atlantic and Pacific coasts.


    Rhizophora mangle - Red Mangrove











    Last edited by Reefahholic; 12-18-2016 at 05:05 AM.

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  3. #2
    BOD MEMBER sneezebeetle's Avatar
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    Ok, Im going to play along! I got a mangrove because I had heard they could be beneficial with the absorption of nitrates. My mangrove is now not doing very well, its alive..but barely. I spent some time at fish gallery and fish r us chatting it up about mangroves and their care and am actually getting ready to make some small changes to both of my fuges in the hopes of improving their survivability.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
    Deanna Horning
    M.A.R.S.H. - Board Member
    Marine Aquarium and Reef Society of Houston

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    Supporting Member Reefahholic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sneezebeetle View Post
    Ok, Im going to play along! I got a mangrove because I had heard they could be beneficial with the absorption of nitrates. My mangrove is now not doing very well, its alive..but barely. I spent some time at fish gallery and fish r us chatting it up about mangroves and their care and am actually getting ready to make some small changes to both of my fuges in the hopes of improving their survivability.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

    Is this a red Mangrove?

    What are the current symptoms? Can you post a pic please. :-)

    Also, where is the plant located, what lighting are you running, mag level in your tank?

  5. #4
    BOD MEMBER sneezebeetle's Avatar
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    Will get a pic as soon as I get home but...

    Mag 1330
    Sa 1.026
    Temp 79
    Amm 0
    Nitrite 0
    Kh 8.2
    Nitrate 50 + (been battling this for over a year!)

    I dose 2 part, vinegar, and essentials. Feed corals weekly with marine snow. Fish receive a mix of mysis, brine, soaked in vitamins and garlic.

    50gl total water volume. Recently switched from canister filtration that had been in place nearly 2 yrs to a hob sump/fuge with skimmer. Canister was cleaned by-weekly with aquarium water vice fresh water to maintain colonizing bacteria in the media. Now using LR and a chaeto/algae mix (chaeto, sprinella, dragons breath, and culpera) pods, live mysis, and macro brittle stars present. The mangrove has lost all but one leaf with no signs of regrowth.

    At the recommendation of FG, will be adding 1" miracle mud to the bottom of the fuge and submerging 1"-2" of root into the mud.

    Again, pics to come...

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
    Deanna Horning
    M.A.R.S.H. - Board Member
    Marine Aquarium and Reef Society of Houston

  6. #5
    Supporting Member Reefahholic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sneezebeetle View Post
    Will get a pic as soon as I get home but...

    Mag 1330
    Sa 1.026
    Temp 79
    Amm 0
    Nitrite 0
    Kh 8.2
    Nitrate 50 + (been battling this for over a year!)

    I dose 2 part, vinegar, and essentials. Feed corals weekly with marine snow. Fish receive a mix of mysis, brine, soaked in vitamins and garlic.

    50gl total water volume. Recently switched from canister filtration that had been in place nearly 2 yrs to a hob sump/fuge with skimmer. Canister was cleaned by-weekly with aquarium water vice fresh water to maintain colonizing bacteria in the media. Now using LR and a chaeto/algae mix (chaeto, sprinella, dragons breath, and culpera) pods, live mysis, and macro brittle stars present. The mangrove has lost all but one leaf with no signs of regrowth.

    At the recommendation of FG, will be adding 1" miracle mud to the bottom of the fuge and submerging 1"-2" of root into the mud.

    Again, pics to come...

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

    To me, it sounds like the plant is having a hard time excluding the sodium. No growth, fallen leaves, leaves turning yellow, wilting leaves, are all signs.

    Retest and raise your Mag level. Are you spraying the leaves? If so, how often and with what?

    Where is the plant placed, and how far is the light from the leaves?
    Last edited by Reefahholic; 12-18-2016 at 10:05 AM.

  7. #6
    Supporting Member Reefahholic's Avatar
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    Btw, if you sump that tank, and add 10-15 liters of Siporax...that nitrate issue is history. If anybody wants to take her readings before and 3 months after the change...I'll put $500 on it. That is...if she'd be willing to do it. :-)

  8. #7
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    This has inspired me. I may have to make a shallow mangrove tank. Dang you Jared!!

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  10. #8
    BOD MEMBER sneezebeetle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reefahholic View Post
    To me, it sounds like the plant is having a hard time excluding the sodium. No growth, fallen leaves, leaves turning yellow, wilting leaves, are all signs.

    Retest and raise your Mag level. Are you spraying the leaves? If so, how often and with what?

    Where is the plant placed, and how far is the light from the leaves?
    I am not spraying the leaves. What would you recommend? Do you have an opinion on the miracle mud?

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
    Deanna Horning
    M.A.R.S.H. - Board Member
    Marine Aquarium and Reef Society of Houston

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  12. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark L. View Post




    This has inspired me. I may have to make a shallow mangrove tank. Dang you Jared!!
    Someone won a really nice tank for this at the Christmas party last night.

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  14. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by sneezebeetle View Post
    I am not spraying the leaves. What would you recommend? Do you have an opinion on the miracle mud?

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
    I actually agree with Jared on this one though through research not experience. Mangroves expelled salt through there leaves. If it builds up, it will essentially suffocate the plant. Using a spray bottle with rodi once every couple of days will help. I think the miracle mud is a good option as a substrate for the mangrove. Siporex for nitrate control.

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